The Victorian seats still in limbo as postal votes are counted

0
The future leadership of five Victorian seats, particularly former Liberal deputy leader Josh Frydenberg‘s seat of Kooyong, remains in limbo as millions of postal votes are counted.
Significantly, the seats of Kooyong and Menzies are at serious risk of being taken from the Liberal Party for the first time ever, just as the seat of Higgins was on Saturday night.

The wait continues to see if any of the candidates will call the result ahead of the end of vote counting.

Josh Frydenberg gives his last press conference as treasurer.
Josh Frydenberg gives his last press conference as treasurer. (Nine/Today)

9News and other outlets called the seat of Kooyong as a win for Independent Dr Monique Ryan on Sunday, but Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has not conceded his role as its MP.

“It is mathematically possible that I could retain Kooyong, but it is obviously very, very difficult,” Frydenberg said.

Loss of the seat would mark the first time it has fallen from the Liberal Party.

Ryan has all but claimed victory over Kooyong.

“I think that there is a momentum for change in Australia, in the Australian political system,” she said on Sunday.

“I don’t think any of us understands what we have achieved, we have built on a grassroots movement and it doesn’t end here.”

Frydenberg was considered a potential leader-in-waiting of the Liberal party, but his likely exit from Parliament would leave outgoing defence minister Peter Dutton in the box seat.

Ryan was steaming ahead in the contest, with 54 per cent of votes on a two-party preferred basis on Monday morning, when 71.66 per cent of votes had been counted.

However, her and Frydenberg were almost neck-and-neck when it came to first preference votes, with less than 100 separating the rivals.

Liberal MP Michael Sukkar is hoping to get a fourth term as Deakin’s representative, but he is in a tight contest with Labor candidate Matt Gregg.

The fight between the two is looking like it will come down to the knife’s edge, with just over 1000 votes separating them on a two-party preferred basis on Monday morning, when about 80 per cent of votes had been counted.

Gregg was in the lead, however, Sukkar was leading the first preference votes, with Gregg being put in front by preferences from those who voted for Greens candidate Rob Humphreys.

190703 Jacqui Lambie tax cuts demands Tasmanian social housing debt Coalition Federal Politics news Australia
Liberal Michael Sukkar is hoping to be re-elected for Deakin. (AAP)

Liberal MP Keith Wolahan is on track to hold onto his seat of Menzies in Melbourne’s outer northeast, which has never been held by Labor.

However, Labor candidate Naomi Oakley was just 624 votes behind on a two-party preferred basis, with 71.04 per of votes having been counted.

The Liberals are looking like they will manage to keep hold of Casey, but Labor candidate Bill Brindle was trailing behind by just over 2200 votes on a two-party preferred basis on Monday morning.

New Liberal candidate Aaron Violi was also leading the number of first preference votes, with 72.19 per cent of votes having been counted.

Retiring Liberal MP and longtime Speaker Tony Smith won the seat by 4.6 per cent in 2019.

The strangest moments of the 2022 federal election campaign

Labor MP Josh Burns is on track to keep hold of the seat of Macnamara, leading with about 4500 votes on a two-party preferred basis when 62.67 per cent of votes had been counted.

Liberal candidate Colleen Harkin was trailing with 42.4 per cent of the preference votes, with Greens candidate Steph Hodgins-May having picked up a significant number of first preference votes.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.